Chorus 4: MU.912.H.1.1

Big Idea: Historical and Global Connections
  • Understanding: Through study in the arts, we learn about and honor others and the worlds in which they live(d).
    • Benchmark: Investigate and discuss how a culture's traditions are reflected through its music.
☆ Categorized as Best Assessed in the Classroom (BAC)

Students will be able to:

  • listen to, discuss, and perform representative examples of music from diverse cultures and eras.
  • identify, discuss, and perform music having a cultural function, e.g., anthems, fanfares, religious and ceremonial music, holidays, athletic events, etc.
  • listen to representative examples of music from diverse cultures and eras.
    • exposure to different music genres (early music to present-day music)
  • Discuss the different musical style periods with key word associations:
    • Middle Ages (500-1400): Gregorian chant, standardization of music notation.
    • Renaissance (1400-1600): Early instruments, music moves towards major/minor modes.
    • Baroque (1600-1750): Polyphony, ornamentation.
    • Classical (1750-1830): Clarity of melody through homophony, greater emphasis on dynamics and phrasing, clear cadences, structure of music clearly defined.
    • Romantic (1815-1910): Mostly homophonic, increased emotional expression through music, more freedom from strict structures, bolder dynamic contrasts and climaxes.
    • 20th Century (1900-2000): Extreme registers and unconventional use of instruments, emphasis on rhythmic elements, experimentation with non-tonal systems, introduction of electronic media, rise of education and accessibility to popular music.
  • identify examples of music as a cultural function, e.g., anthems, fanfares, religious and ceremonial music, holidays, athletic events, etc.

Students will know:

  • exposure to different music genres (early music to present-day music)
  • Middle Ages (500-1400): Gregorian chant, standardization of music notation.
  • Renaissance (1400-1600): Early instruments, music moves towards major/minor modes.
  • Baroque (1600-1750): Polyphony, ornamentation.
  • Classical (1750-1830): Clarity of melody through homophony, greater emphasis on dynamics and phrasing, clear cadences, structure of music clearly defined.
  • Romantic (1815-1910): Mostly homophonic, increased emotional expression through music, more freedom from strict structures, bolder dynamic contrasts and climaxes.
  • 20th Century (1900-2000): Extreme registers and unconventional use of instruments, emphasis on rhythmic elements, experimentation with non-tonal systems, introduction of electronic media, rise of education and accessibility to popular music.