Chorus 4: MU.912.O.1.1

Big Idea: Organizational Structure
  • Understanding: Understanding the organizational structure of an art form provides a foundation for appreciation of artistic works and respect for the creative process.
    • Benchmark: Evaluate the organizational principles and conventions in musical works and discuss their effect on structure.
☆ Categorized as Important (I) ☆ To be evaluated by Responding Items (R)

Students will be able to:

  • independently define music terms and symbols in a given piece, e.g., tempo markings, dynamics, key, and meter, etc.
  • independently identify melody, countermelody, and accompaniment.
  • independently differentiate between melody and harmony.
  • independently differentiate between major and minor tonality.
  • independently describe timbre, tone color, and texture.
  • independently differentiate between solo, small ensemble, and large ensemble.
  • independently identify major musical themes including sections and patterns that outline structural form.
  • Describe texture of music:
    • Monophonic: single melodic line without any accompaniment
    • Homophonic: single melodic line supported with harmonic accompaniment
    • Polyphonic: two or more independent melodic voices (usually imitative)
    • Heterophonic: two or more voices simultaneously performing variations of the same melody
  • Describe melodic contour:
    • similar motion: movement of two musical lines in same direction but with different intervals
    • parallel motion: movement of two musical lines in same direction with the same quantitative intervals
    • contrary motion: movement of two musical lines in opposite directions
    • oblique motion: movement of one musical line while another remains on the same pitch
  • Identify music structure and the levels of organization:
    • Passage/Phrase: musical sentences, usually marked with cadences
    • Piece: entire structure of self-contained work
    • Cycle: several pieces that are grouped together as a larger work (suites, operas, concertos, song cycles, sonatas, etc...)
    • Strophic: the same music used with different verses of text (hymns, blues, many folk and popular songs, etc...)
    • Through-composed: different music for each stanza of lyrics (operas, modern musicals, movie scores, etc...)
  • Identify compositional techniques:
    • imitation
    • sequence (immediate restatement of melodic material at higher or lower pitch)
    • inversion (melody turned upside down)
    • rise and fall contour of melody

Students will know:

  • Monophonic: single melodic line without any accompaniment
  • Homophonic: single melodic line supported with harmonic accompaniment
  • Polyphonic: two or more independent melodic voices (usually imitative)
  • Heterophonic: two or more voices simultaneously performing variations of the same melody
  • similar motion: movement of two musical lines in same direction but with different intervals
  • parallel motion: movement of two musical lines in same direction with the same quantitative intervals
  • contrary motion: movement of two musical lines in opposite directions
  • oblique motion: movement of one musical line while another remains on the same pitch
  • Passage/Phrase: musical sentences, usually marked with cadences
  • Piece: entire structure of self-contained work
  • Cycle: several pieces that are grouped together as a larger work (suites, operas, concertos, song cycles, sonatas, etc...)
  • Strophic: the same music used with different verses of text (hymns, blues, many folk and popular songs, etc...)
  • Through-composed: different music for each stanza of lyrics (operas, modern musicals, movie scores, etc...)
  • imitation
  • sequence (immediate restatement of melodic material at higher or lower pitch)
  • inversion (melody turned upside down)
  • rise and fall contour of melody