Jazz Ensemble 4 - Honors Pacing Guide

Time-Period Currently Unspecified
observe classroom rules. (DA.912.S.2.1BAC )
respect peers and equipment. (DA.912.S.2.1BAC )
show focus and pacing during self-directed practice time. (DA.912.S.2.1BAC )
accurately decode music notation. (LAFS.1112.RST.2.4BAC )
interpret and apply music-specific vocabulary to performances. (LAFS.1112.RST.2.4BAC )
unify ideas and decisions though collaboration and communication according to music rehearsal convention within sections, across the ensemble, and with the director. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.1BAC )
  • rehearsal communication conventions
initiate independent refinement of repertoire through collaboration with peers. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.1BAC )
  • solo and ensemble literature selection
  • ensemble personnelle selection
  • selection of sectional passages for rehearsal purposes
evaluate the efficacy and value of a guest clinician, conductor, or adjudicator's presentation with regard to their delivery. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.3BAC )
  • vocal tone, facial expression, gestures
  • syntax, semantics, lexicon
discuss the content of a speaker's or lecturer's presentation (live or recorded) with regard to substantiated evidence. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.3BAC )
  • evidence, data, statistics
write a reflection of both formal and informal performances, identifying strengths and weaknesses specific to musical elements such as articulations, phrasing, intonation, balance, and rhythmic precision. (LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4BAC )
  • musical elements such as articulations, phrasing, intonation, balance, and rhythmic precision
write an eight measure melodic/rhythmic dictation including steps, skips and chromatics (LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4BAC )
  • knowledge of music notation fundamentals
compose an eight measure melody over a given harmonic structure. (LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4BAC )
  • knowledge of music notation fundamentals
write a short critique of a rehearsal (LAFS.1112.WHST.2.4BAC )
  • conductor's objectives
create and share musical projects on the internet (LAFS.1112.WHST.2.6BAC )
  • reputable online resources for creating music, e.g., Audacity, Garageband, Finale, etc.
  • reputable online resources for sharing music and music-related material, e.g., Youtube.com, Bandcamp.com, Musescore.com, etc.
discuss the factors that make an improvised solo exemplary and identify appropriate models (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • repetition of a theme, variation on the melody of the piece, quotes from solos, the melody, or other melodies, use of space as opposed to constant motion, etc.
follow a transcription of a solo while listening to a performance and evaluate the expressive techniques and improvisational techniques of the soloist. (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
compare performances/recordings of solos, combos, and big bands using the Florida Bandmasters Association jazz rubric. (MU.912.C.1.2I R)
research historical and biographical information for composers and featured performers of music being rehearsed in class to investigate composers intent. (MU.912.C.1.2I R)
  • appropriate methods and resources for historical/biographical/cultural research
listen to two or more quality recordings of a piece being rehearsed in class and compare the musical interpretation of the ensemble. (MU.912.C.1.2I R)
  • similarities or differences in sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, growth, etc.
listen to two or more quality recordings of a piece being rehearsed in class and discuss how the soloists interpret the melody through improvisation. (MU.912.C.1.2I R)
  • similarities or differences in sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, growth, etc.
Identify compositional elements which may indicate composer’s intent (MU.912.C.1.2I R)
  • expressive markings, tempo markings, dynamic markings, title of the piece, etc.
critique past recordings of one’s performance and develop a plan for continued, sequential improvement. (MU.912.C.2.1BAC )
access and listen to jazz recordings and performances through live and online resources. (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
recognize performance techniques utilized by jazz musicians in performance of a solo (written/improvised), jazz combo, or big band (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
  • style, articulations, dynamic contrast, phrasing, balance, blend, intonation, tone quality, breath support, posture, etc.
recognize, in a professional recording or video, expressive techniques utilized by jazz musicians (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
  • vibrato, half-valves, glissandos, brushes on drums, scoops, turns, drum kicks that are not notated, etc.
follow a transcription of a solo while listening to a performance and evaluate the expressive techniques and improvisational techniques of the soloist. (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
collaboratively create a checklist based on fundamental improvisational techniques to be applied to one's own compositions/improvisations (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
  • repetition of a theme, variation on the melody of the piece, quotes from solos, the melody, or other melodies, use of space as opposed to constant motion, etc
plan and notate a solo for a piece being rehearsed in class; edit according to the checklist of fundamental improvisational techniques. (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
  • fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation.
discuss the factors that make an improvised solo exemplary,. (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
  • repetition of a theme, variation on the melody of the piece, quotes from solos, the melody, or other melodies, use of space as opposed to constant motion, etc.
identify exemplary models of improvised solos. (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
follow a transcription of a solo (accessed online or from a publication such as a “Real Book”) while listening to a performance and evaluate the expressive techniques and improvisational techniques of the soloist. (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
critique past recordings of one’s performance and develop a plan for continued, sequential improvement. (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
  • technical exercises, flexibility exercises, long tones, etc.
describe how the rise of the phonograph and radio effected the development of jazz music. (MU.912.F.1.1BAC )
  • Traditional and contemporary methods of acquisition of jazz music
discuss developments in studio recording from the earliest jazz records to current digital recording practices. (MU.912.F.1.1BAC )
  • Traditional and contemporary methods of production of jazz music
describe the benefits of utilizing music notation software, e.g., Finale, MuseScore, Sibelius. (MU.912.F.1.1BAC )
  • Traditional and contemporary methods of production of jazz music
investigate the use of virtual and electronic instruments in jazz recordings and performances, e.g., the inclusion of electronic instruments in fusion. (MU.912.F.1.1BAC )
  • Traditional and contemporary methods of production of jazz music
develop a repertoire list. (MU.912.F.2.1BAC )
identify leadership attributes/opportunities gained through ensemble membership (MU.912.F.2.1BAC )
identify collaborative skills gained through music participation. (MU.912.F.2.1BAC )
identify learned traits that enhance or lead to critical thinking skills: analysis, brainstorming, problem solving, etc. (MU.912.F.2.1BAC )
describe how the arts can enrich a community’s social and cultural climate. (MU.912.F.2.2BAC )
  • models/examples of an artistically enriched community
describe the benefits for an industry relocating to a community enriched by the arts. (MU.912.F.2.2BAC )
  • needs for an industry for success (employee moral, increased productivity, community resources, etc.)
  • characteristics of an artistically enriched community
describe the financial impact that a large industry provides to an arts community. (MU.912.F.2.2BAC )
  • large industries that influence the arts (e.g., publishing, radio, etc.)
compare and contrast arts outreach programs and their impact on the community or region (MU.912.F.2.2BAC )
  • arts outreach programs (e.g., Brevard Youth Symphony Orchestra, Brevard Historical Society, etc.)
describe the hierarchy of an ensemble and that of a business. (MU.912.F.2.3BAC )
analyze the similarities of an ensemble hierarchy and business leadership. (MU.912.F.2.3BAC )
Analyze techniques for getting the most improvement possible out of practice time. (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • Components of a successful practice session (e.g., goal oriented objectives, warm up, technique and tone studies)
Mentor younger students and encourage behaviors that transfer to being a good leader, e.g., self-motivation, timeliness, mentoring, collaboration, cooperation, creative problem solving, delayed gratification, etc. (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • Personal leadership skills, e.g., motivating and inspiring others, timeliness, mentoring, collaboration, cooperation, creative problem solving, delayed gratification, etc.
Promote to others the importance of leadership opportunities outside of the music room. (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • resources for seeking out leadership opportunities in the community (e.g., local charities, community initiatives, etc.)
describe how skills in the music room transfer into other content areas. (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • skills required in the band room and in other content areas (e.g., musicianship, punctuality, etc.)
Model effective rehearsal and performance expectations and behaviors. (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • effective rehearsal and performance behavior (e.g., focus, making notes in music, quiet on stage, etc.)
Analyze strategies for getting the most improvement possible out of sectional time (i.e., plan of improvement, goal oriented objectives, individual assessment, etc.) (MU.912.F.3.1BAC )
  • strategies for effective sectional time (e.g., warm up, long tones for intonation, isolating sections and working out technique, etc.)
create a list of goals to be accomplished for the year. (MU.912.F.3.4BAC )
  • proper goal setting techniques (e.g. backwards planning)
create a daily and long term practice plan. (MU.912.F.3.4BAC )
  • focused practice routines and methods
critique past recordings of one’s performance and develop a plan for continued, sequential improvement. (MU.912.F.3.4BAC )
  • models of proper and appropriate examples of musical skills and techniques
  • pedagogical methods (e.g., isolate small sections, slow down tempos)
explore the genres and corresponding historic periods in jazz music through performance of a varied repertoire. (MU.912.H.1.4NTK R)
  • Genres/historic period e.g., Traditional, Dixieland, Ragtime, Vaudeville, Musical Theatre, Big Band, Bebop, Blues, Fusion, Latin, Funk, and Rock.
explain the historical connection of jazz compositions studied in class with particular events or time periods when applicable (MU.912.H.1.4NTK R)
identify the cultural influences of regions associated with music studied in class, when applicable (MU.912.H.1.4NTK R)
describe historical and cultural movements that have effected composers, performers, and the development of the jazz art form (MU.912.H.1.4NTK R)
perform jazz compositions of varied styles, forms and periods. (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
identify exemplary models, within various cultures, for one’s own instrument, e.g., quality recordings. (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
recognize performance techniques utilized by jazz musicians within various cultures (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
  • style, articulations, dynamic contrast, phrasing, balance, blend, intonation, tone quality, breath support, posture, etc.
recognize culturally specific examples of expressive techniques utilized by jazz musicians (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
  • vibrato, half-valves, scoops, turns, drum kicks that are not notated, etc.
emulate the sound qualities or instrumental techniques of jazz musicians within various cultures (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
explore the genres and corresponding historic periods in jazz music (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
  • appropriate methods and resources for historical, biographical, and cultural research
  • Genres/historic period e.g., Traditional, Dixieland, Ragtime, Vaudeville, Musical Theatre, Big Band, Bebop, Blues, Fusion, Latin, Funk, and Rock.
describe historical and cultural movements that have effected composers, performers, and the development of the jazz art form (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
  • Historical and cultural movements, e.g., melting pot cultures in large cities, the Civil Rights Movement, the World War II generation and Big Band, music education in public schools
rehearse and study a transcribed melody from an exemplary performer of a specific genre/culture (MU.912.H.1.5I R)
recognize and describe the media through which music may be accessed (MU.912.H.2.2BAC )
access the most current jazz recordings and performances through live and online resources. (MU.912.H.2.2BAC )
explore the genres and corresponding historic periods in jazz music (MU.912.H.2.3NTK R)
  • Genres/historic periods associated with jazz genres, e.g.,Traditional, Dixieland, Ragtime, Vaudeville, Musical Theatre, Big Band, Bebop, Blues, Fusion, Latin, Funk, and Rock
discuss the evolution of jazz genres considering the historical and cultural movements that have effected the evolution of the jazz art form. (MU.912.H.2.3NTK R)
  • appropriate methods and resources for historical, biographical, and cultural research
describe historical and cultural movements that have effected composers, performers, and the development of the jazz art form (MU.912.H.2.3NTK R)
  • Historical and cultural movements, e.g., melting pot cultures in large cities, the Civil Rights Movement, the World War II generation and Big Band, music education in public schools, etc., and their influence on the genesis of a specific genre
describe how the rise of the phonograph and radio effected the development of jazz music. (MU.912.H.2.3NTK R)
  • traditional and contemporary methods of acquisition of music
compare and contrast two works from differing historic and style periods in jazz. (MU.912.H.2.3NTK R)
investigate music notation, sequencing and looping software (MU.912.H.2.4BAC )
  • Software may including Finale, Sibelius, MuseScore, Garage Band, Mixcraft, Fruityloops, Audacity, etc.
explore different avenues of acquiring music from the internet (MU.912.H.2.4BAC )
  • Methods of acquisition including mp3, streaming audio, radio, streaming video resources.
describe how the rise of the phonograph and radio effected the development of jazz music. (MU.912.H.2.4BAC )
conceptualize and integrate connections between music and non-musical content areas e.g., music and health, music and art, music and advertising, etc. (MU.912.H.3.2BAC )
conceptualize and integrate learning connections between music and personal interest subjects such as world languages, African American history, drama and theatre, T.V./film production, scientific research, public speaking, data analysis, computer programming, etc. (MU.912.H.3.2BAC )
conceptualize and integrate knowledge and skills developed from varied content areas to musical concepts. (MU.912.H.3.2BAC )
describe the role of solos and solis in a big band composition. (MU.912.O.1.1E R)
  • sixteen, and thirty-two bar, standard 12 and 16 bar blues chord progressions.
recognize and describe the role of the rhythm section during solo sections (MU.912.O.1.1E R)
  • the role of the rhythm section during solo sections, e.g., changes in texture, comping, etc.
Analyze and compare compositional techniques and concepts in contrasting pieces (MU.912.O.2.1E P)
  • compositional techniques and concepts including instrumentation, harmonic/melodic/rhythmic complexities, musical influences (blues, Latin), textures, etc.
Perform repertoire with contrasting styles and structural elements (MU.912.O.2.1E P)
transpose a melody into another key. (MU.912.O.2.2BAC )
transpose a melody from major to minor. (MU.912.O.2.2BAC )
recognize and describe modes in music being rehearsed. (MU.912.O.2.2BAC )
identify modes with corresponding chord progressions for improvisation, when applicable. (MU.912.O.2.2BAC )
transpose a transcribed melody from an exemplary model into another key (MU.912.O.2.2BAC )
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
recognize how a composer of a given jazz composition manipulates expressive elements to create a mood or feeling. (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • variations of styles, dynamics, tempo, articulations, phrasing, harmony (major/minor), timbre and orchestration
develop a hypothesis for the composer’s intent in a piece being rehearsed in class. (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • elements such as title, similar works, time period, etc. may convey composer’s intent
Analyze how the expressive and compositional elements of the piece reflect the meaning of lyrics when applicable. (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • lyrics and their meaning
analyze excerpts from programmatic jazz works and explain how the composer used compositional techniques to tell a story (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • Examples of programmatic jazz works, e.g.,Charles Mingus’ Fables of Faubus, Duke Ellingston’s Far East Suite or Wynton Marsalis’/Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra’s Big Train, etc.
recognize expressive techniques utilized by jazz musicians (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • vibrato, half-valves, scoops, turns, drum kicks that are not notated, etc.
describe the historical background of a jazz composition, when applicable (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
  • appropriate methods and resources for historical/biographical/cultural research
describe and give examples of imagery to express the mood of a section of a piece of music (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
create a program note or story line based on a piece being rehearsed in class. (MU.912.O.3.1E R)
explore and apply jazz vocal syllables (MU.912.O.3.2E P)
  • Jazz vocal syllables, e.g., bop, wop, doo-dot, dit, daht.
identify the high and low points of a phrase. (MU.912.O.3.2E P)
  • indicators of phrase structure, e.g., dynamics, harmonic progressions, cadences, etc.
name the notes of arpeggios for various triads and various seventh chords (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • Notes of various chords (e.g. major, minor, diminished, augmented, dominant seventh, major seventh)
name the chords and notes of arpeggios for a standard twelve-bar blues. (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • Chord progression and chord structure for a standard 12 bar blues
create call-and-response melodies based on the notes of the melody (head) of a piece being rehearsed in class; play over repeated chord progressions by the rhythm section. (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
plan and notate a rough draft of a solo to be played in a solo section of a piece being rehearsed in class (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • Fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
accurately recognize and notate the notes of the treble and bass clefs. (MU.912.S.1.2BAC )
  • notes of the treble and bass clefs.
accurately recognize and notate key signatures and meters. (MU.912.S.1.2BAC )
  • key signatures and meters
create call-and-response melodies based on the notes of major or minor scales for trading exercises. (MU.912.S.1.2BAC )
  • major/minor tonalities
create call-and-response melodies based on the notes of the melody (head) of a piece being rehearsed in class; play over repeated chord changes by the rhythm section. (MU.912.S.1.2BAC )
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
plan and notate a rough draft of a solo to be played in a solo section of a piece being rehearsed in class (MU.912.S.1.2BAC )
  • fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
identify major/minor tonality, major, minor and seventh chords, and modulations. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • notes of major and minor scales and seventh chords
sing an improvised melody based on sixteen-bar blues. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • Chord progression and chord structure for a standard 16 bar blues
create a written solo based on the head of the composition by altering rhythms and order of pitches. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
create variations on a written solo by altering rhythms and pitches. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
transpose a transcribed melody from an exemplary performer into another key (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
echo a motive played or sung by a teacher as part of an ensemble warm-up. (MU.912.S.1.4E O)
trade two to four measure melodies with a peer while the rhythm section repeats chord progressions. (MU.912.S.1.4E O)
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
notate the melody of a familiar children’s song or folk song: correct meter, key signature, pitches, and rhythms. (MU.912.S.1.4E O)
  • Fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
transcribe eight or more measures of a solo from an exemplary recording (with help from the teacher, if necessary). (MU.912.S.1.4E O)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
plan and notate a rough draft of a solo to be played in a solo section of a piece being rehearsed in class. (MU.912.S.1.4E O)
  • Fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
construct a timeline of a piece representing the form; include dynamic and phrase impact points. (MU.912.S.2.1E P)
  • Applicable forms (12-bar blues, ABA song form, rounded binary, etc.)
  • indicators of phrase structure, e.g., dynamics, harmonic progressions, cadences, etc.
sing, using appropriate jazz syllables, rhythms with style, and articulations. (MU.912.S.2.1E P)
  • jazz syllables (doo-dot, daht, dit, wop, etc.)
discuss shaping within a section of music being rehearsed (MU.912.S.2.1E P)
  • musical phrase, contour, musical line.
perform a written solo from memory with dynamic variations and expressive techniques (MU.912.S.2.1E P)
  • vibrato, half-valves, scoops, turns, drum kicks that are not notated, etc.
memorize the solo of an exemplary performer from a transcription. (MU.912.S.2.1E P)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
sight-read a new piece with appropriate performance and expressive techniques (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
identify and describe the characteristics of jazz styles from recordings. (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
  • Characteristics of jazz styles, e.g., ensemble size, emphasis on solo/improvisation, instrumentation of winds, instrumentation of rhythm section, swinging eighths, emphasis on beats 2 and 4, harmonic complexities, prevalence of blues influence, use of textures, energy, etc.
identify exemplary recordings of a piece being rehearsed in class or a piece with similar characteristics. (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
recognize, in a professional recording or video, performance techniques utilized by jazz musicians (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
  • style, articulations, dynamic contrast, phrasing, balance, blend, intonation, tone quality, breath support, posture, etc.
recognize, in a professional recording or video, expressive techniques utilized by jazz musicians (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
  • vibrato, half-valves, scoops, turns, drum kicks that are not notated, etc.
discuss the factors that make a rhythm section exemplary (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
  • piano comping, drum kicks or set-ups, bass accents on beats two and four in swing, etc.
evaluate the ensemble/individual performance of a section of music being rehearsed/sight-read. Analyze based on the list of performance and expressive techniques (MU.912.S.2.2E P)
rehearse and perform arrangements of jazz standards in a jazz combo setting with peers (with help from the teacher, if necessary). (MU.912.S.3.1E P)
perform music selections in simple meters. (MU.912.S.3.2E O)
understand and demonstrate dynamic markings and phrasing. (MU.912.S.3.2E O)
perform the roadmap (MU.912.S.3.2E O)
  • Roadmaps may include repeats, endings, Da Capo, Da Segno, Coda, Fine, etc.
sing rhythms using appropriate jazz syllables and style. (MU.912.S.3.2E O)
  • Appropriate Jazz syllables (do-dot, daht, wop, dit, etc.)
sight-read a new piece. (MU.912.S.3.2E O)
echo a motive played or sung by a teacher as part of an ensemble warm-up. (MU.912.S.3.3I R)
trade two to four measure melodies with a peer while the rhythm section repeats chord progressions. (MU.912.S.3.3I R)
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
notate the melody of a familiar children’s song or folk song: correct meter, key signature, pitches, and rhythms. (MU.912.S.3.3I R)
  • fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
notate a short step-wise melody played by the teacher or a peer. (MU.912.S.3.3I R)
  • fundamentals of rhythmic/melodic notation
transcribe eight or more measures of a solo from an exemplary recording (with help from the teacher, if necessary). (MU.912.S.3.3I R)
  • appropriate methods of accessing recordings and transcriptions such as NAXOS, iTunes, music libraries, publications like Real Books, etc.
evaluate progress on a section of music following a rehearsal session, and identify strategies for further improvement. (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
  • how to reflect, assess for retention of information/skills, review and refine deficiencies
develop a plan for a sectional rehearsal. (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
  • organization, pacing, focus, goals
evaluate progress on a section of music following a sectional rehearsal, and identify strategies for further improvement. (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
  • how to reflect, assess for retention of information/skills, review and refine deficiencies
All Year
watch two performances of a piece on YouTube and determine what techniques contribute to the musicality. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.2BAC )
  • proper performance posture, position, and technique
listen to two recordings of a piece of music on Naxos and determine which rendition most effectively conveys the composer's intent. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.2BAC )
  • stylistic characteristics based on style period, nationality, cultural background
Read a score while listening to the piece, compare it to another arrangement or edition, and discuss the differences and similarities in class. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.2BAC )
  • score reading: systems, parts, score order
·use correct music vocabulary in class discourse to identify, define, discuss, reflect, and debate relevant topics. (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
·articulate opinions, questions, and answers so that the intended meaning is understood. (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
research and prepare a piece of music for rehearsal (score study). (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
  • score study
lead a sectional or rehearsal utilizing communication conventions, such as referencing the measure number before making relevant comments. (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
  • rehearsal communication conventions
describe correlations between technique and performance in a rehearsal piece. (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
use recordings to model stylistic elements to enhance understanding of stylistically similar music being rehearsed/performed (LAFS.1112.SL.2.5BAC )
  • resources for finding recordings and video, e.g. Naxos, iTunes, Youtube, etc.
use music notation software to create resources for music being rehearsed/performed (LAFS.1112.SL.2.5BAC )
  • various available music notation programs, e.g. Finale, Sibelius, MuseScore
use recordings to model stylistic elements to enhance understanding of stylistically similar music being rehearsed/performed (LAFS.1112.SL.2.5BAC )
  • resources for finding recordings and video, e.g. Naxos, iTunes, Youtube, etc.
routinely revisit, address, research and assess musical problems/questions encountered through rehearsal/performance. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7BAC )
cite a variety of sources to address a musical problem/question, e.g., multiple recordings of the same work, method books, technical studies, etc. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7BAC )
  • sources to address research topic questions, e.g. library resources, reuptable online resources, etc.
listen to multiple recordings of the same piece to develop a preferred interpretation of a musical element (e.g., phrasing, tempo, dynamic contrast). (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9BAC )
listen to multiple recordings within a specific genre to understand the defining stylistic elements. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9BAC )
listen to multiple pieces by the same composer to realize a composer’s style and technique. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9BAC )
prepare a varied repertoire with attention to technical, stylistic, and expressive elements as indicated in the music. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9BAC )
  • notes and rest values
  • dynamic and expressive markings
  • articulation markings
  • musical styles/genres: see MU.912.C.1.4
recognize the connection between a problem and a properly used tool that may provide a solution (MAFS.K12.MP.5.1BAC )
  • e.g., metronome, tuner, notation software, digital recorder, pencil, reference materials and media resources, accumulated knowledge, maintenance accessories, ear protection, keyboard instruments, microphone, amplifier
understand that specific tools, while assisting in the process, do not supersede skills and technique. (MAFS.K12.MP.5.1BAC )
demonstrate precision in the execution of unison pulse within the ensemble regarding rhythmic accuracy (attack, duration, release), synchronized rhythmic execution and tempo. (MAFS.K12.MP.6.1BAC )
  • note/rest values appropriate to course and literature
  • time signatures appropriate to course and literature
use domain specific vocabulary to communicate precise ideas and opinions with others. (MAFS.K12.MP.6.1BAC )
demonstrate precision in execution of pitch accuracy and intonation regarding tonality (MAFS.K12.MP.6.1BAC )
  • tonality: MU.68.C.1.1
demonstrate precision in the execution of expressive elements regarding the execution of dynamics, articulations, phrasing, and style. (MAFS.K12.MP.6.1BAC )
  • expressive markings that relate to musical effect regarding dynamics, tempo, phrasing, musical line, dynamics, style, articulations
  • standard conducting patterns
  • expressive conducting gesture
utilize pattern recognition to memorize music. (MAFS.K12.MP.7.1BAC )
reorganize performance practices according to given rhythmic hierarchies (MAFS.K12.MP.7.1BAC )
  • beat groupings and metric stress
recognize patterns through music theory and utilize the information in rehearsal, individual practice, and performance. (MAFS.K12.MP.7.1BAC )
  • patterns such as form, time signatures, phrasing, sequencing, hemiola, key centers, harmonic structure, voicing, modulation, and instrumentation.
employ active listening strategies (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • active listening strategies include accessing prior knowledge to improve interest in unfamiliar works, focused listening, anticipating composer’s intent through elements such as title, similar works, time period, etc.
recognize and demonstrate appropriate musical components in a jazz composition being rehearsed/sight-read (MU.912.O.3.2E P)
  • style, melody/countermelody, basic jazz harmony, dynamics, tonality, phrasing, contour, shaping, tempo, rhythms, and instructional music terminology
rehearse and perform a varied repertoire of age appropriate big band literature (MU.912.S.3.1E P)
demonstrate proper fingerings as well as alternate/trill fingerings for the extended range for an instrument (MU.912.S.3.5E P)
understand and perform the various styles of articulation (MU.912.S.3.5E P)
  • proper tonguing technique (e.g., hitting the teeth or the reed in the appropriate spot with the tongue).
recognize in tune/out of tune and how to make the appropriate adjustments (MU.912.S.3.5E P)
  • basic intonation (i.e., playing in tune with others)
demonstrate proficiency on a variety of percussion instruments (MU.912.S.3.5E P)
  • mallet technique, snare rudiments, auxillary percussion techniques (e.g., major/minor scales, 40 essential snare rudiments, etc.)
demonstrate various extended techniqies on an instrument (MU.912.S.3.5E P)
  • breathing techniques
  • pitch manipulation
  • alternate fingerings
First Semester
identify styles of jazz performance (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • swing, ballad, Latin, rock, fusion, etc.
identify the various styles of big band jazz works (MU.912.O.1.1E R)
  • swing (various tempos), ballad, Latin, Funk, Rock, etc.
First Quarter
develop criteria used to evaluate musical and stylistic performance (MU.912.C.2.1BAC )
  • note/rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, dynamics, jazz style, articulation, and expressive jazz techniques (vibrato, half-valves, glissandos, brushes on drums, etc.)
Address personal performance using a sequential plan for improvement (MU.912.C.2.1BAC )
  • technical exercises, flexibility exercises, long tones, etc.
develop criteria used to evaluate musical and stylistic performance (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
  • note/rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, dynamics, jazz style, articulation, expressive jazz techniques (vibrato, half-valves, glissandos, brushes on drums, etc.)
trade two bar or four bar improvised melodies with members of the ensemble while the rhythm section repeats a given chord progression. (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
discuss the factors that make a big band or jazz combo performance exemplary (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
  • adherence to style, expressive playing, technical facility, intonation, blend, balance, tone quality, creative improvised solos, etc.
discuss the factors that make a rhythm section exemplary (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
  • piano comping, drum kicks or set-ups, bass accents on beats two and four in swing, etc.
define copyright and discuss proper usage of applicable materials, media, and performances. (MU.912.F.3.2NTK R)
  • Copyright law and ethical considerations, as well as consequences for copyright abuse (e.g., illegal and legal reproduction of materials, legal and ethical options for obtaining out-of-print music)
explain the rules of usage of public domain music (MU.912.F.3.2NTK R)
  • Musical materials which fall under public domain, and acceptable uses (e.g., Maximum copyright protection, acceptable resources for pubic domain music)
recognize and discuss the legal and illegal methods of acquiring music on the internet: pirated music vs. licensed music. (MU.912.F.3.2NTK R)
  • Legal and illegal use of the internet to obtain printed music (e.g., online "pay-to-print" companies, versus pirated music sites)
explore the similarities/differences between two different arrangements of one jazz standard (MU.912.H.1.3NTK R)
  • Overall body of work of selected composers (e.g., works of Glen Miller, Dave Brubek, etc.)
identify the basic structure of a big band jazz composition (MU.912.O.1.1E R)
  • introduction, head/main theme, solos (optional), soli (optional), recapitulation, and coda.
recognize the melody (head) of a jazz composition, and describe how the composer develops or manipulates the theme throughout the work (MU.912.O.1.1E R)
  • variations, a solo, etc.
play a variation on a melody from music being rehearsed in class while the rhythm section repeats chord changes. (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
create call-and-response melodies based on the notes of a major scale for trading exercises. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
create an effective personal practice plan. (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
  • technical exercises, flexibility exercises, long tones, etc.
recognize and describe the necessary factors for an effective ensemble rehearsal. (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
  • organization, pacing, focus, goals
discuss rehearsal strategies and their application to personal practice (MU.912.S.3.4E R)
Week 1
recognize the function of lines and spaces of the staff (including the addition of ledger lines) as the means of visually representing pitch (MAFS.K12.MP.7.1BAC )
identify exemplary models for one’s own instrument (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
echo a motive played or sung by a teacher as part of an ensemble warm-up. (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
Week 3
understand rhythmic relationships regarding time signature classification. (MAFS.K12.MP.7.1BAC )
  • simple, compound and mixed meters
  • function of top and bottom numbers in time signatures
Week 5
Identify accidentals (LAFS.1112.RST.2.4BAC )
  • flats - lower pitch
  • sharps - raise pitch
  • naturals - cancel previous accidentals
Second Quarter
recognize and evaluate major musical components of jazz (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • style melody/countermelody, basic jazz harmony, dynamics, tonality, phrasing, contour, shaping, tempo, rhythms, and instructional music terminology
evaluate one’s own performance in a solo (improvised/written) or jazz combo using the criterion in the FBA Solo and Ensemble rubric. (MU.912.C.2.1BAC )
evaluate a performance of a solo (written/improvised), jazz combo, or big band using the previously established criteria. (MU.912.C.2.2I R)
discuss the factors that make an improvised solo exemplary (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
  • repetition of a theme, variation on the melody of the piece, quotes from solos, the melody, or other melodies, use of space as opposed to constant motion, etc.
identify the exemplary factors of a professional recording and identify areas of improvement in one’s own ensemble performance. (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
compare and contrast performances/recordings of solos, jazz combos and big bands using FBA rubrics. (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
identify exemplary models of improvised solos considering factors that make an improvised solo exemplary. (MU.912.C.3.1E R)
discuss the financial and social implications of copyright infringement. (MU.912.F.3.2NTK R)
explore the similarities/differences between arrangements of the same composition for different ensembles (MU.912.H.1.3NTK R)
  • Various arrangements of a selected piece of music (e.g., "Autumn Leaves" for big band, combo, etc.)
experiment with improvised melodies based on pitches from major, minor, dominant seventh, and blues scales (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • Notes of various chords (e.g. major, minor, diminished, augmented, dominant seventh, major seventh)
sketch the form of a work being rehearsed in class. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • 12-bar blues, ABA song form, rounded binary, etc.
Week 16
Discuss performance etiquette: (MU.912.F.3.3BAC )
  • On stage: posture, acceptable amounts of body movement, focus and eye-contact with director, positioning and spacing on stage, entrance and exit from stage.
  • Audience member: allow others to see unobstructed; allow others to hear unobstructed; allow others the freedom to engage active or passive listening without interruption. Appropriate concert recognition: genuine or respectful applause only; for exceptional performance, standing applause only.
Week 17
analyze the elements of a given performance. (MU.912.F.3.3BAC )
  • Effect of different performance areas on acoustics
  • Amount of aural feedback from various stage positions
  • Tendency of observers to focus on things that do not match
Second Semester
present comparisons of works within a genre citing specific style characteristics and using domain-specific vocabulary to represent a point of view. (LAFS.1112.SL.2.4BAC )
  • genre, style characteristics
listen to a recording or watch video of a performance and use the FBA adjudication rubric to assign a rating, drawing evidence from the rubric and/or the music to support the rating. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.9BAC )
  • understanding and applying technical vocabulary of rubric
  • active listening skills
Third Quarter
Read adjudicator comments along side of listening to recordings of your group to discuss the validity of comments, prioritize rehearsal needs accordingly, and brainstorm actions to improve performance. (LAFS.1112.SL.1.2BAC )
  • rubric for performance assessment
  • techniques to address various performance needs
identify major musical components using listening maps. (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
evaluate a professional recording of an improvised solo, using the checklist of fundamental improvisational techniques. (MU.912.C.2.3BAC )
listen to and discuss the various mediums a given composer uses to present works. (MU.912.H.1.3NTK R)
  • Mediums of performance music (e.g., blues, jazz orchestra, big band, combo rock band, etc.)
play a variation on a written solo by altering rhythms and pitches. (MU.912.S.1.1I O)
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
create call-and-response melodies based on the notes of the melody (head) of a piece being rehearsed in class; play over repeated chord progressions by the rhythm section. (MU.912.S.1.3BAC )
  • melody, repetition, chord structure, rhythmic interest, and articulations.
Fourth Quarter
conduct a research project on a musical topic, such as a specific composer/performer, musical style period, piece of music, etc. (LAFS.1112.WHST.3.7BAC )
  • sources to address musical questions, e.g., multiple recordings of the same work, method books, technical studies, etc.
explain personal preferences of music using correct music vocabulary (MU.912.C.1.1BAC )
  • course specific vocabulary referring to style, expressive elements, form, etc.
Week 35
sequence the tasks necessary to organize a performance event. (MU.912.F.3.3BAC )
design and implement materials related to the performance. (MU.912.F.3.3BAC )